New Things and a Change of Mind

After continually working on developing my blind embossing and my film I needed a change of pace, at least for a little while. I started doing more research on urban voids in Dundee to see if I could come across something that I had not before. After finding my way onto the governments website a found a file that is very relative to my project, a map of Dundee that highlights the cities derelict and vacant land.

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At first I was a little frustrated about not finding this map sooner due to having to scour the city myself to find these bare areas of land. However after thinking about it, I am glad I did not have this map. Finding the land by myself was a big part of my process and my concept, I was looking for and uncovering what I and other members of the public usually ignore. Being told where it is took away the challenge of finding the land for myself and noticing the unnoticed. It was difficult when I set out as I often did not know where to start but it made it even more spectacular when discovering this forgotten land.

I did want to use this map though as I could not ignore it relevance to my project. I decided to use the map as a template and mark out the shape of Dundee along with the empty land it holds. I decided to laser cut this design onto mdf and turn it into a blind embossing, just like my framed prints. I love the marks made and it really shows the abundance of forgotten land in a fairly small city which does not just lie in the poorer districts, but all over Dundee. The sites that I chose to look at when making my series of urban void blind embossing are also from all around Dundee and I will show this when displaying them in geographical order, highlighting that even those living in affluent areas can forget about their empty land.

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After framing my aforementioned urban voids blind embossing, I was unsure on the colour of the molding. I had opted for natural wood but, when imagining my completely white space, I felt like natural wood but stick out too much and the viewer would be concentrating on the frame rather than the print. To solve this, I framed another print using off-white paint so as not to make the print look less white to compare against the natural wood frame. I found this to be a lot more successful and tested how the frame would look against a shaving foam covered wall. I feel like you can see the frame enough to know it is not trying to blend into the space and it will still draw people in to see what is inside the frame. I just have to work out how to properly photograph my framed prints without glare and to get the detail from the embossing.

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I have also been considering what to do with my digital drawings of urban voids that I used to create my blind embossing. I wanted to develop these images as I enjoy the aesthetic of them and was interested in where I could take them. I printed these images on acetate and decided it would be interesting to see how these would look as screen prints on canvas. All white screen prints are very hard to make as they are difficult to see, as I found out at the start of 4th year. to solve this I mixed burnt umber with white ink to create an off-white colour that still keeps in with the same white tones but is visible. I created one print on canvas and left it as is, and printed one more which I then sprinkled dried shaving foam that I scraped off from my studio wall (you can find out more about this technique here https://laurendailly12.wordpress.com/2017/02/22/foam-canvas-development/). My plan is to screen print all of my urban void images and perhaps try to sell these at the degree show.

After researching the jute mills that once stood at the site of my fashion film, I decided to research what used to be at the land of my other urban voids in the same era. I was surprised to see how many of these areas were home to jute and textile mills, while some held no buildings at all.

I printed the maps from the 1900s onto jute to bring the history of this land alive and to fill the urban void.

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After hanging my foam canvases on top of the jute I wanted to find a way to relate the two textures together. I have always loved the swirling shape that shaving foam creates when directly sprayed out of a can, so I decided to mimic this shape with jute. The completely different materials are made strangely alike by creating a relationship between the two through form.

I decided to try this out with the previously printed jute as well to see how this would alter the relationship. I love how the material bares the image void while the white shaving foam creates the feeling of the void, both of which join together to produce the concept of my degree show. The history of the void will be uncovered.

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